Thermographic Infrared Maps

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A program in Belgium is using aerial thermographic infrared maps of neighborhoods to give folks a contextual sense of their home’s heat loss. On the image above, the blue homes are losing much less heat than the red ones and are better insulated. Viewing this kind of map gives folks a sense of how their home’s insulation levels compare to that of their neighbor’s home.

You can click the image above to watch the video (it will take you to another page), or watch it here. Unfortunately, you will have to watch a brief ad before you can see the video clip.

This post is part of our Friday video series.

Oaklavia

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Thousands Play in Oakland’s Streets at the First-Ever ‘Oaklavia’ fromStreetfilms on Vimeo.

On October 2, Oakland will hold an event called Oaklavia, closing a few miles of roads to cars to let people experience car-free city streets. Today’s video is the community reaction to the first time Walk Oakland Bike Oakland organized Oaklavia, last year.

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You can learn more about Oaklavia at its website, oaklavia.org, or at walkoaklandbikeoakland.org.

See you there?

THIS POST IS PART OF OUR FRIDAY VIDEO SERIES.

Seattle’s 2030 District

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This video highlights the first high-performance building district. The Seattle 2030 District is a district in downtown Seattle that aims to dramatically reduce the environmental impacts of facility construction and operations. It just announced it’s formal launch. Check it out – maybe we can do this in other cities!

If you do not see the video embedded above, click here to watch it on YouTube.

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You can find out more about the Seattle 2030 District here.

THIS POST IS PART OF OUR FRIDAY VIDEO SERIES.

ZETA Factory and Installation

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Many of you may have heard of ZETA Communities, a company that builds high performance and net zero energy modular housing, schools, and commercial structures that can be installed quickly and in dense urban areas.

A few weeks ago, they posted a video of how the structures are assembled in their factory,and they highlight some of the potential benefits of modular construction.

If you do not see the video embedded above, click here to watch it on YouTube.

I am also posting a video of one of their structures being installed on a site. (Note: the video does not have any sound.)

If you do not see the video embedded above, click here to watch it on YouTube.

THIS POST IS PART OF OUR FRIDAY VIDEO SERIES.

UC San Diego Lighting Retrofit

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My friend Anna Levitt, assistant campus energy manager at UC San Diego, is profiled in a video detailing the campus’s approach to a major lighting retrofit project. It’s a good overview of what it takes to achieve energy savings at this scale (for example, replacing 40,000 light bulbs, or “lamps”).

You can see the video on the UC San Diego website here.

THIS POST IS PART OF OUR FRIDAY VIDEO SERIES.

Liter of Light

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I’ve seen this project highlighted on a number of other sites lately, but wanted to share it here. I was struck by how simple a solution it is. I also wanted to note, though, that the homes in which the lights are being installed are not being very thermally compromised, since they are in hot climates and have little if any insulation. I am curious about how the flashing detail works to prevent leaks during rainstorms. If you know, leave a comment.

If you can’t see the embedded video, click here.

THIS POST IS PART OF OUR FRIDAY VIDEO SERIES.

Scott Shell on Designing ZNE Buildings

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Scott Shell is an internationally recognized expert on designing high-performance and zero net energy (ZNE) buildings. And he is based right here in the Bay Area, at San Francisco architecture firm EHDD Architecture.

The video is hosted on the aecKnowledge website here.

THIS POST IS PART OF OUR FRIDAY VIDEO SERIES.

Announcing the Friday Video Series!

We have come across an increasing number of interesting and informative videos by local experts, tours of tiny houses or efficient buildings, and graphical explanations of how infrastructure works. We would like to being sharing these in a more organized way. Introducing…the Friday Video Series!

We will be kicking off the series this Friday with a video about designing zero net energy buildings by a Bay Area expert. Stay tuned.

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We’d love suggestions of  any videos you’d like to see profiled in this series (especially if they highlight people or buildings in the Bay Area and Northern California). Feel free to suggest them in the comments or send me a note at anna AT zeroresource DOT com.

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Tour A Tiny Apartment in Spain

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Our previous posts on tiny houses (here and here) are consistently among our most-viewed posts here at Zero Resource. As I find more interesting tiny dwellings, I will post them. Today, I am posting a video tour of a tiny apartment in Spain, converted from a rooftop pigeon coop. Enjoy!

If the embedded video above does not appear, you can also find the video on YouTube here.

There are a number of other video tours of tiny houses and apartments on YouTube. I’ll post some of them over the next couple weeks.

The House of the Future?

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In Berkeley, we are fortunate to have such events as Science at the Theater, where Lawrence Berkeley National Lab researchers give talks on their work at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre. The lectures are free and get a pretty sizeable audience. The lectures are recorded and put on YouTube.

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(The video can also be watched here – the technical stuff starts at about 10 minutes in.)

On May 10, 2010, I was in the audience as LBNL folks talked about their vision of the house of the future:

Learn what it will take to create tomorrow’s net-zero energy home as scientists reveal the secrets of cool roofs, smart windows, and computer-driven energy control systems.

The net-zero energy home
Scientists are working to make tomorrow’s homes more than just energy efficient — they want them to be zero energy. Iain Walker, a scientist in the Lab’s Energy Performance of Buildings Group, will discuss what it takes to develop net-zero energy houses that generate as much energy as they use through highly aggressive energy efficiency and on-site renewable energy generation.

Talking back to the grid
Imagine programming your house to use less energy if the electricity grid is full or price are high. Mary Ann Piette, deputy director of Berkeley Lab’s building technology department and director of the Lab’s Demand Response Research Center, will discuss how new technologies are enabling buildings to listen to the grid and automatically change their thermostat settings or lighting loads, among other demands, in response to fluctuating electricity prices.

The networked (and energy efficient) house
In the future, your home’s lights, climate control devices, computers, windows, and appliances could be controlled via a sophisticated digital network. If it’s plugged in, it’ll be connected. Bruce Nordman, an energy scientist in Berkeley Lab’s Energy End-Use Forecasting group, will discuss how he and other scientists are working to ensure these networks help homeowners save energy.

Assemblymember Nancy Skinner also spoke at the beginning, about energy in buildings and RECO programs.

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